For Women and Science: Meet the Award-Winning Scholars 2021

For Women in Science / L’Oréal, UNESCO and ABC Laureate Researchers (Photo: L’Oréal Disclosure)

In a reality where science is becoming more and more necessary every day, projects that encourage, both technically and economically, the participation of women in this field are even more substantial. One of the initiatives most relevant to this mission, is For women and scienceHe is 16 years old. Issuance of promoting important relationships and awarding grants to projects developed by women.

The partnership between L’Oréal Brazil, UNESCO and the Brazilian Academy of Sciences has been further strengthened in recent times, due to the profound social and behavioral changes brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. With a team of amazing women playing key roles, the 2021 edition of the award is luxurious. And here at Marie Claire, we directly present the seven researchers from the fields of life sciences, physical sciences, chemical sciences, and mathematics, who each receive a R$50,000 scholarship.

:Life science:
+ Letícia Couto: A biologist and professor at the Federal University of Mato Grosso do Sul (UFMS), he studies how to restore the Pantanal biome and its surroundings, considering its ecological and economic importance and finding a balance between the demands of society and the preservation of ecosystems. “The Pantanal is, by definition, well prepared for fire. But in recent years we have seen a serious escalation of fires. Citing the result of a recently published study with her collaborators, Leticia explains that about 43% of the areas burned in the Pantanal in 2020 have not been burned for 20 years. general.

For Women and Science: Leticia Cotto (Image: Publicity)

+ Lillian Catenacci: A professor at the Federal University of Piauí (UFPI), she has traveled to different regions of Brazil to conduct research with a unique approach to health, thinking about human and animal health and the environment in a connected way. “You can’t separate one thing from another,” Lillian says.

For Women in Science: Lillian Catenacci (Image: Publicity)

For Women in Science: Lillian Catenacci (Image: Publicity)

+ Marta Giovannitti: A virologist from the Oswaldo Cruz Foundation (Fiocruz), he works on genetic surveillance for viruses such as dengue, Zika, chikungunya and yellow fever. She believes that to improve public health care, it is essential to understand the dynamics of the spread of viruses that cause these diseases. Marta emphasizes that “genome monitoring and tracing of circulating pathogens are also essential for predicting future outbreaks and epidemics that are still at an early stage, and thus can also help in controlling emerging infectious diseases.”

For Women and Science: Marta Giovannitti (Image: Publicity)

For Women and Science: Marta Giovannitti (Image: Publicity)

+ Thaissa Michelin: An ecologist and professor at the Federal University of Pará (UFPA), she has been honored for her study of the aquatic plants of the Amazon, especially those of Pará. Human resources, such as agriculture and livestock, affect the existence of these plants. Aquatic plants provide structure and shelter for various species. For example, they are used as a hatchery for fingerlings (anchovies), some of which we use in our diet,” he explains.

For Women and Science: Taissa Michelin (Image: Publicity)

For Women and Science: Taissa Michelin (Image: Publicity)

:chemistry:
+ Anna Cecilia Albergaria Barbosa: A professor at the Federal University of Bahia (UFBA), is investigating the presence of pollutants in Antarctica. Before the Covid-19 pandemic, he traveled for about two months to Antarctica to collect samples of sediment and material suspended in water. All of this material can reach Antarctica in many different ways. One possibility is to arrive by plane. It shows that volatile compounds used in the tropics with warm climates reach the highest layers of the atmosphere, travel around the planet and then deposit in cooler places, such as Antarctica.”

For Women and Science: Ana Cecilia Albergaria Barbosa (Image: Publicity)

For Women and Science: Ana Cecilia Albergaria Barbosa (Image: Publicity)

:physics:
+ Ingrid Barcellos: A physicist at the National Center for Research in Energy and Materials (CNPEM), located in Campinas-SP, studies shale and light inside very small structures, barely a few nanometers in size. Despite the small size, the possibilities are enormous: on the basis of this knowledge it will be possible to develop new technologies for optoelectronic devices such as computer chips and mobile phones. The scientist explains that “the properties of materials, for example, the way they conduct heat or electricity, can change dramatically at the nanoscale.”

For Women and Science: Ingrid Barcellos (Image: Publicity)

For Women and Science: Ingrid Barcellos (Image: Publicity)

: mathematics:
+ Fernanda de Bastiani: A professor at the Federal University of Pernambuco (UFPE), her research focuses on mathematics and statistics about the public health emergency facing the world. Its goal is to help understand the spatial variability of Covid-19 in Pernambuco, noting the number of cases, the number of deaths, the infection rate and other variables in each region. We can assess the mortality rate from the disease and try to correlate it with socio-economic indicators. Or we can see that the more populous municipalities do not necessarily have a higher rate of Covid-19 infection, and then we will study why there are more cases than others in some areas.”

For Women and Science: Fernanda de Bastiani (Image: Publicity)

For Women and Science: Fernanda de Bastiani (Image: Publicity)

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