Marburg virus leaves a “ghost appearance” in patients, so what is it?

Marburg virusAnd the Ebola familyis undergoing its first spread in Ghana, Africa: It is already causing concern in the community, and is putting health authorities on alert.

Marburg virus

In the past few hours, Ghanaian authorities have reported that The microorganism killed the first two people In a hospital in the southern Ashanti region. In addition, they indicated that There are 98 people in quarantine for being suspected cases.

Doctors point out that Marburg virus is known to be deadly and highly contagious. This disease belongs to the Ebola virus family and there is no cure or vaccine.

for this part, The World Health Organization (WHO) considers it extremely deadly: average rate Disease fatality fluctuates by 50%. During recent outbreaks, these rates have ranged from 24% to 88% depending on the viral strain and treatment of the cases.

Marburg virus in Ghana

How does Marburg virus spread?

The expert indicates that Marburg virus is transmitted to humans by fruit bats It is spread between humans through the transmission of bodily fluids.

This disease, now known as Marburg virus (MVD), was previously called Marburg hemorrhagic feverThe World Health Organization emphasizes that it is “serious and often fatal”.

Symptoms of Marburg virus

The first symptoms that are detected when infected with Marburg virus are:

  • Severe viral hemorrhagic fever
  • Severe diarrhea
  • An expressionless face with sunken eyes

So far, No treatments or vaccines have been authorized to combat MVDWhat is done before infection is to treat the symptoms.

The first outbreak of Marburg was in Germany and Serbia in 1967, when seven infection-related deaths were reported. In 2005 it killed more than 200 people in Angola.

In addition to that country WHO has previous record of boats and sporadic cases in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya, South Africa and Uganda.

Countries on alert for Marburg virus outbreak

Given this scenario, Disease outbreak declared in GhanaAnd neighboring countries, with even greater risks of being hit, are already on the alert.

“Health authorities responded quickly, anticipating the preparation for a possible outbreak. This is a good thing because without immediate and decisive action the Marburg virus could easily spiral out of control,” WHO Africa Director Machidiso Moeti said in a statement.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.