Researchers propose a new theory about the mysterious death of 9 tourists in the Dyatlov Pass in 1959

The official version of the declassified case concluded that the hikers were killed by “a force greater than they could not resist.” However, during these 60 years, countless accounts of events emerged, ranging from an attack by escaped prisoners to foreign intervention.

Los Angeles, Jan.29 (RT). Researchers from Federal Polytechnic School of Zurich, Switzerland, Presented a New study Which they want to explain, through the use of simulations, the peculiar circumstances that Nine Soviet tourists were killed in the Dyatlov Pass 60 years ago while hiking in the Ural Mountains.

At that time, the bodies of the victims were found in various places on the eastern slope of Mount Utorton or Sial Tours (which in Mansi language means “the mountain of the dead”) and at various distances from the tent, some with little clothing and others with severe injuries, such as Torn tongue or drainage of eye sockets. The tent was empty and its side was torn off.

The official version of the declassified case concluded that the hikers were killed by “a force greater than they could not resist.” However, during these 60 years, countless accounts of events emerged, ranging from an attack by escaped prisoners to foreign intervention.

Last year, Russian authorities finally confirmed the cause of the hikers’ deaths, saying that the tragedy was due to an avalanche and that the youth’s inability to find the tent after leaving was due to poor visibility.

Now, the authors of the new study, published in Communications Earth & Environment, suggest that what killed the tourists was not an ordinary avalanche, but what is known as an avalanche, in which a large solid mass of snow falls from sediments. The Swiss believe that this phenomenon could explain the mysterious circumstances of the tragedy.

We used data on snow friction and local topography to show that a small plate collapse can occur on a gentle slope, leaving few traces. “With the help of computer simulations, we demonstrated that the impact of the ice sheet can cause injuries similar to those observed,” said Johan Gome, lead author of the study.

Alexander Poserin, a co-author of the study, said that the “initial trigger” of the avalanche was that members of the expedition crossed the slope to set up the tent. Then the catapatic winds would have blown off the snow and allowed an additional load to build up. “At some point, a crack could form and spread, causing the ice sheet to detach,” said Bozrin, who admitted they hadn’t fully solved the puzzle, as there are still several questions to be solved.

“The truth, of course, is that nobody really knows what happened that night. But we are presenting strong quantitative evidence that the avalanche theory is plausible.”

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